40. China Part 1: Hong Kong: Dim Sum

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China is simply too big to choose 1 dish, it would be cruel to choose 1 dish while China has sooo many good dishes! So I split China up in 4 parts. And I know there are 8 culinary regions in China I will start with Hong Kong!

Soooo Hong Kong… Hong Kong is the most western orientated province in China. Officially known as Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the People’s Republic of China but that doesn’t fit on passports or official documents so let’s just keep it casual and call it Hong Kong! When people think about Hong Kong they think about: growing Chinese economy, THE foodiecity in Asia, skyscrapers, expensive hotels,… but what they seem to forget is that Hong Kong has been around for a while (5000 years). So how did Hong Kong become so businesslike? Well after the first opium war (1839-1842) the British took control of Hong Kong. That way it became sort of a European city in Asia! Only in 1997 Hong Kong became a part of China! The city became China’s first Special Administrative Region on 1 July 1997 under the principle of “one country, two systems”.

Hong KongHere are some things you didn’t know about Hong Kong:

  • Hungry? Hong Kong is home to around 11,000 restaurants – almost one for every 680 residents – In fact, there are so many eateries that you could dine at a different restaurant every night for the next 30 years.
  • Fire up your Rolls-Royce. It’s said that Hong Kong boasts more Rolls-Royces per capita than anywhere else in the world.
  • Vertical horizons. To match its thick population density, Hong Kong boasts the highest number of skyscrapers in the world by far.
  •  The fragrant harbour. Oh the irony. Hong Kong actually translates as “fragrant harbour”.

Hong Kong food or Cantonese food is enjoyed all over the world  and is closest to the flavor of Chinese takeaway food. It is the sweetest and is the most similar to the Western palate. This week I made dim sum. I love dim sum and I have been looking forward to this for a while now! My mom always has a plater of dim sum in the freezer just in case we have guests, but my brother, sister and I often eat them for lunch or a quick snack. Which she doesn’t make a fuss about because it’s pretty healthy, at least better then devouring a bag of chips. This particular type of dim sum is called siu mai. I didn’t get the shape right because my wonton sheets were round instead of square, but honestly they were delicious! I had never tasted the homemade ones because even restaurants buy them most of the time but you do actually taste the difference.

Dim SumIngredients: 150gr of king prawns, 150 gr of pork mince, 1 clove of garlic, minced, 1 chunk of ginger, grated, 1 spring onion, 2 water chestnuts, 1 tbsp roasted chopped peanuts, 2 tsp soy sauce, 1 tsp sesame oil, 2 tsp cornflour, 20 wonton wrappers, sweet chili sauce (for dipping), 1 tbsp brown sugar, 1 red chilli, 1 spring onion

Chuck the prawns, mince, garlic, ginger, spring onion, soy sauce, sesame oil,red chili,  cornflour into a food processor and pulse into a rough paste. Chop the water chestnuts and roasted peanuts as finely as possible and mix into the paste. Transfer the mixture into a bowl and cover it with clingfilm. Leave it in the fridge for 30 minutes. Lay out the wonton wrappers on a surface and place a heaped teaspoon of the mixture into the middle of each wrapper. Fold the edges up of the wrappers up around the mixture, leaving a hole in the top (brush the pastry with water if it struggles to stick). Cut away any excess wrapper. Boil a little water in a wok or saucepan. Sit your steamer over the water (You could also use a sieve over a deep saucepan). Place a square of greaseproof paper into the steamer and add the dumplings. Put the lid on the steamer and cook for 10 minutes.

 

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4 thoughts on “40. China Part 1: Hong Kong: Dim Sum

    Gils, J. van (Jacques) said:
    January 28, 2015 at 10:17 am

    Ga het onmiddellijk eten Kus papa

    Op 28 jan. 2015 om 18:12 heeft Little Lost Cook <comment-reply@wordpress.com> het volgende geschreven:

    margotvangils posted: “China is simply too big to choose 1 dish, it would be cruel to choose 1 dish while China has sooo many good dishes! So I split China up in 4 parts. And I know there are 8 culinary regions in China I will start with Hong Kong! Soooo Hong Kong… Hong Ko”

    notquiteyetawriter said:
    January 28, 2015 at 11:10 am

    Cool! Dont forget to have some quality high grade tea green jasmine everything

      saskia Pessers said:
      February 2, 2015 at 3:46 pm

      Goeie informatie lekker bondig en top geschreven Margot maar……. heb hulp nodig als ik het ga bereiden ……invited ! xT-Sas

        margotvangils said:
        February 2, 2015 at 4:37 pm

        hahaha ik kom snel weer een keertje langs

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