Month: March 2018

120: Liechtenstein: Käsknöpfle

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Liechtenstein a tiny little dot smack in the middle of Europe. Squeezed in between Switzerland and Austria. Liechtenstein is the stuff of fairytales – a mountain principality governed by an iron-willed monarch, embedded deep in the Alps and crowned by tiny castles. Only 25km long by 12km wide (at its broadest point), Liechtenstein doesn’t have an international airport, and access from Switzerland or Austria is by local bus. The western, more populated side of the country is in the Rhine Valley and relatively flat; the east is mountainous. Outdoor enthusiasts are in their element here, with a large number of trails to hike and slopes to ski given the country’s size. Go out into the Alpine wilderness beyond Vaduz and, suddenly, this landlocked little nation no longer seems so small.

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Things you didn’t know about Liechtenstein:

  • Switzerland unintentionally invaded Liechtenstein in March 2007, when about 170 Swiss infantry soldiers wandered across the unmarked border for more than a mile into Liechtenstein before realizing their mistake.
  • Once a year, ALL the residents are invited to party in a castle.On Liechtenstein’s national holiday, His Serene Highness Prince Hans-Adam II, the head of state, and his son, His Serene Highness Hereditary Prince Alois, invite the residents of their tiny principality to have a beer in the garden of Vaduz Castle, the princely ancestral residence.
  • It’s the world’s leading manufacturer of false teeth. Based in the mini-metropolis of Schaan, a company called Ivoclar Vivadent leads the world in false teeth manufacturing, accounting for 20 percent of the total sales worldwide.
  • In a pamphlet directed toward new immigrants, mowing lawns or holding “noisy festivities” during the country’s official lunch break, which runs from noon to 1:30 p.m, is strongly advised against. The same holds true after 10 p.m.
  • Liechtenstein was originally purchased by the princes of Liechtenstein—the principality was christened after their family name—for its political value. The princes bought what’s now known as Liechtenstein because it was the last remnant of the Holy Roman Empire, and owning it meant that they could obtain a seat and a vote in the Imperial Diet in Vienna, thereby increasing their power.

This good fulfilling recipe will warm you right up after an intensive day of skiing in the mountains or hiking it’s very nice and cheesy!

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119. Libya: Fish with Spiced Tomato Sauce

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Libya is an ancient crossroads of civilizations. On the Libyan coast, you can some of the finest Roman and Greek ruins in existence, among them Leptis Magna, Cyrene, and Sabratha. Libya also has some of the most beautiful corners of the Sahara Desert, from seas of sand the size of Switzerland and as well as mysterious caravan towns (Ghadames) and an isolated black-as-black volcano (Wawa al-Namus) in the desert’s heart. A country with so beauty much to explore… yet so much unrest. The country has been as unstable ever since the revolution 2011. The whole country remains off-limits to travelers with chronic instability and ongoing conflict.

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Things you didn’t know about Libya:

  • Much of the central and eastern area of the country is covered by the Libyan Desert. The Libyan Desert is one of the most sun-baked and arid places on earth. There is no average rainfall — the land may go for decades with no rain and the highlands for five to ten years without it
  • Tripoli the capital is also known as the Mermaid of the Mediterranean for its turquoise waters and whitewashed buildings.
  • The Berbers identify themselves with their village or tribe before their country.
  • Food is eaten with three fingers on the right hand. The left is considered unclean. Good manners dictate you leave a little food on your plate to indicate that your host is a gracious and generous provider.
  • Saving face is important to Libyans, who are non-confrontational. They avoid disagreeing or saying no

This Libyan fish is really good the spicy sauce is really tasty and a great change from what I normally do with fish.

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